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HoloTime

Saturday, 2 August 2008

Every now and then I am reminded of a rather paranoid idea, that I entertained seriously for a while about ten years ago. When I watched the video’s of the lecture by Richard Hoagland (see July 30), this idea entered my mind again. What Richard Hoagland tells in this lecture is fascinating in itself: it is extremely original and I have no idea if it is true science or plain nonsense. But what stroke me was this idea: it seems as if the past is constantly changing. I mean, it seems to me as if the past is being changed all the time, but in a very special way, that makes it very difficult to notice it. It seems as if there is more and more past constantly being created right now.
Of course, these changes in the past have to fit the “facts” that we already have about the past. But it seems to me that reality is very fringy at the edges and that there is a lot of room for re-writing or changing the past. Every change or addition in the past has to fit whatever there already is: you cannot blow up the Great Pyramid in 1974, because it is still here in 2008. But there is a lot about the Great Pyramid that we don’t know and in the area’s of not-knowing there is “space” to make little changes. And in certain corners of reality there is far more space for re-writing the past. Like in what is on Mars for example.
Reality seems to be an on-going work of art, that is never finished. We are still creating the past in the present. We are told, or we tell ourselves, that the past is fixed and finished and that the future is created from the present, but I often think it might be very well the other way around: maybe the past is created from the present and the future is in a way already there. That would mean that the whole history, from beginning to end, is already there, but constantly being re-created. If course, it is just an idea.
Here is a song that has nothing to do with all this, ”Hologram world” by a band called The Tiny Masters of Today:

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